Fair Pay Rally for Direct Care Workers


 

 

Here is information on the Rally that Stephen and I will be attending next Friday.  Please join us if you can. Thank you!

 

NYC FAIR info@nycfair.org via mail104.atl161.mcsv.net 

8:00 AM (13 hours ago)

to me

Visit Our Website: www.nycfair.org
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NYC FAIR

FAMILY ADVOCACY INFORMATION RESOURCE

MULTIPLE OPPORTUNITIES TO ADVOCATE:
NYS Senator Golden & other Legislators will be at St. Francis College On Friday, Feb. 3rd, 2017

RALLY TO SUPPORT THE WORKERS WHO SUPPORT PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL & DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

DATE:  Friday, February 3rd

11 a.m. – 12 p.m. Rally

Doors open 10:30

RALLY: Urge Governor Cuomo and State Legislators

to support #bFair2DirectCare and provide funding

for the direct care workers to receive a living wage.

LOCATION: St. Francis College

182 Remsen Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Brooklyn Elected Officials will be speaking, as well as

other concerned parents and advocates.

*RSVP REQUIRED

Contact: abittinger@ucpnyc.org

* Upon registration, indicate need for wheelchair access.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/BFair2DirectCare

Twitter: @Fair2DirectCare

Hashtag:  #bFair2Direct Care

Subways: 2, 3, 4, 5, R to Borough Hall/Court St & A, C F, R to Jay St/Metro Tech

 

 

 

 

 

Discrimination against Innocent People


Oscar-winning Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi is nominated for another Academy Award this year, but he may not be able to attend the Feb. 26 ceremony due to Trump’s recent executive order suspending entry to the U.S. for citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries. Farhadi’s The Salesman, which follows a couple whose relationship is tested as…

via Donald Trump’s Immigration Order May Bar Oscar-Winning Iranian Director From Attending Academy Awards — TIME

If They come for you in the Morning……


 

http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/itcitmbaldwin.html

An Open Letter to My Sister,
Angela Y. Davis

by James Baldwin

Dear Sister:

One might have hoped that, by this hour, the very sight of chains on Black flesh, or the very sight of chains, would be so intolerable a sight for the American people, and so unbearable a memory, that they would themselves spontaneously rise up and strike off the manacles. But, no, they appear to glory in their chains; now, more than ever, they appear to measure their safety in chains and corpses. And so, Newsweek, civilized defender of the indefensible, attempts to drown you in a sea of crocodile tears (“it remained to be seen what sort of personal liberation she had achieved”) and puts you on its cover, chained.
You look exceedingly alone—as alone, say, as the Jewish housewife in the boxcar headed for Dachau, or as any one of our ancestors, chained together in the name of Jesus, headed for a Christian land.
Well. Since we live in an age which silence is not only criminal but suicidal, I have been making as much noise as I can, here in Europe, on radio and television—in fact, have just returned from a land, Germany, which was made notorious by a silent majority not so very long ago. I was asked to speak on the case of Miss Angela Davis, and did so. Very probably an exerciser in futility, but one must let no opportunity slide.
I am something like twenty years older than you, of that generation, therefore, of which George Jackson ventures that “there are no healthy brothers—none at all.” I am in no way equipped to dispute this speculation (not, anyway, without descending into what, at the moment, would be irrelevant subtleties) for I know too well what he means. My own state of health is certainly precarious enough. In considering you, and Huey, and George and (especially) Jonathan Jackson, I began to apprehend what you may have had in mind when you spoke of the uses to which we could put the experience of the slave. What has happened, it seems to me, and to put it far too simply, is that a whole new generation of people have assessed and absorbed their history, and, in that tremendous action, have freed themselves of it and will never be victims again. This may seem an odd, indefensibly pertinent and insensitive thing to say to a sister in prison, battling for her life—for all our lives. Yet, I dare to say it, for I think you will perhaps not misunderstand me, and I do not say it, after all, from the position of spectator.
I am trying to suggest that you—for example—do not appear to be your father’s daughter in the same way that I am my father’s son. At bottom, my father’s expectations and mine were the same, the expectations of his generation and mine were the same; and neither the immense difference in our ages nor the move from the South to the North could alter these expectations or make our lives more viable. For, in fact, to use the brutal parlance of that hour, the interior language of despair, he was just a n—–—a n—– laborer preacher, and so was I. I jumped the track but that’s of no more importance here, in itself, than the fact that some poor Spaniards become rich bull fighters, or thatsome poor Black boys become rich—boxers, for example. That’s rarely, if ever, afforded the people more than a great emotional catharsis, though I don’t mean to be condescending about that, either. But when Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali and refused to put on that uniform (and sacrificed all that money!) a very different impact was made on the people and a very different kind of instruction had begun.

The American triumph—in which the American tragedy has always been implicit—was to make Black people despise themselves. When I was little I despised myself; I did not know any better. And this meant, albeit unconsciously, or against my will, or in great pain, that I also despised my father. And my mother. And my brothers.And my sisters. Black people were killing each other every Saturday night out on Lenox Avenue, when I was growing up; and no one explained to them, or to me, that it was intended that they should; that they were penned where they were, like animals, in order that they should consider themselves no better than animals. Everything supported this sense of reality, nothing denied it: and so one was ready, when it came time to go to work, to be treated as a slave. So one was ready, when human terrors came, to bow before a white God and beg Jesus for salvation—this same white God who was unable to raise a finger to do so little as to help you pay your rent, unable to be awakened in time to help you save your child!
There is always, of course, more to any picture than can speedily be perceived and in all of this—groaning and moaning, watching, calculating, clowning, surviving, and outwitting, some tremendous strength was nevertheless being forged, which is part of our legacy today. But that particular aspect of our journey now begins to be behind us. The secret is out: we are men!
But the blunt, open articulation of this secret has frightened the nation to death. i wish I could say, “to life,” but that is much to demand of a disparate collection of displaced people still cowering in their wagon trains and singing “Onward Christian Soldiers.” The nation, if America is a nation, is not in the least prepared for this day. It is a day which the Americans never expected to see, however piously they may declare their belief in progress and democracy. Those words, now, on American lips, have become a kind of universal obscenity: for this most unhappy people, strong believers in arithmetic, never expected to be confronted with the algebra of their history.
One way of gauging a nation’s health, or of discerning what it really considers to be its interests—or to what extent it can be considered as a nation as distinguished from a coalition of special interests—is to examine those people it elects to represent or protect it. One glance at the American leaders (or figureheads) conveys that America is on the edge of absolute chaos, and also suggests the future to which American interests, if not the bulk of the American people, appear willing to consign the Blacks. (Indeed, one look at our past conveys that.) It is clear that for the bulk of our (nominal) countrymen, we are all expendable. And Messrs. Nixon, Agnew, Mitchell, and Hoover, to say nothing, of course, of the Kings’ Row basket case, the winning Ronnie Reagan, will not hesitate for an instant to carry out what they insist is the will of the people.

But what, in America, is the will of the people? And who, for the above-named, are the people? The people, whoever they may be, know as much about the forces which have placed the above-named gentlemen in power as they do about the forces responsible for the slaughter in Vietnam. The will of the people, in America, has always been at the mercy of an ignorance not merely phenomenal, but sacred, and sacredly cultivated: the better to be used by a carnivorous economy which democratically slaughters and victimizes whites and Blacks alike. But most white Americans do not dare admit this (though they suspect it) and this fact contains mortal danger for the Blacks and tragedy for the nation.
Or, to put it another way, as long as white Americans take refuge in their whiteness—for so long as they are unable to walk out of this most monstrous of traps—they will allow millions of people to be slaughtered in their name, and will be manipulated into and surrender themselves to what they will think of—and justify—as a racial war. They will never, so long as their whiteness puts so sinister a distance between themselves and their own experience and the experience of others, feel themselves sufficiently human, sufficiently worthwhile, to become responsible for themselves, their leaders, their country, their children, or their fate. They will perish (as we once put it in our black church) in their sins —that is, in their delusions. And this is happening, needless to say, already, all around us.
Only a handful of the millions of people in this vast place are aware that the fate intended for you, Sister Angela, and for George Jackson, and for the numberless prisoners in our concentration camps—for that is what they are—is a fate which is about to engulf them, too, White lives, for the forces which rule in this country, are no more sacred than Black ones, as many and many a student is discovering, as the white American corpses in Vietnam prove. If the American people are unable to contend with their elected leaders for the redemption of their own honor and the loves of their own children, we the Blacks, the most rejected of the Western children, can expect very little help at their hands; which, after all, is nothing new. What the Americans do not realize is that a war between brothers, in the same cities, on the same soil is not a racial war but a civil war. But the American delusion is not only that their brothers all are white but that the whites are all their brothers.
So be it. We cannot awaken this sleeper, and God knows we have tried. We must do what we can do, and fortify and save each other—we are not drowning in an apathetic self-contempt, we do feel ourselves sufficiently worthwhile to contend even with the inexorable forces in order to change our fate and the fate of our children and the condition of the world! We know that a man is not a thing and is not to be placed at the mercy of things. We know that air and water belong to all mankind and not merely to industrialists. We know that a baby does not come into the world merely to be the instrument of someone else’s profit. We know that a democracy does not mean the coercion of all into a deadly—and, finally, wicked— mediocrity but the liberty for all to aspire to the best that is in him, or that has ever been.
We know that we, the Blacks, and not only we, the blacks, have been, and are, the victims of a system whose only fuel is greed, whose only god is profit. We know that the fruits of this system have been ignorance, despair, and death, and we know that the system is doomed because the world can no longer afford it—if, indeed, it ever could have. And we know that, for the perpetuation of this system, we have all been mercilessly brutalized, and have been told nothing but lies, lies about ourselves and our kinsmen and our past, and about love, life, and death, so that both soul and body have been bound in hell.
The enormous revolution in black consciousness which has occurred in your generation, my dear sister, means the beginning or the end of America. Some of us, white and Black, know how great a price has already been paid to bring into existence a new consciousness, a new people, an unprecendented nation. If we know, and do nothing, we are worse than the murderers hired in our name.

If we know, then we must fight for your life as though it were our own—which it is—and render impassable with our bodies the corridor to the gas chamber. For, if they take you in the morning, they will be coming for us that night.

Therefore: peace.

Brother James

November 19, 1970

 

 

 

 

Trump’s Whisperer-In-Chief Is Treading on Dangerous Ground | Southern Poverty Law Center


Dhrump is doing his best to muzzle the Free Press and any Americans who disagree with him.

JoAnn Chateau

Southern Poverty Law Center president Richard Cohen has written a most lucid analysis of the new President’s actions to muzzle free speech and create an alternative reality–or as many of us would recognize, a point of view based on propaganda and “alternative facts.”

Trump’s Whisperer-In-Chief Is Treading on Dangerous Ground | Southern Poverty Law Center

White House Chief Strategist Stephen K. Bannon

“The chief strategist in the White House, a man who rallied a growing white nationalist movement behind Donald Trump, is now telling the news media to ‘keep its mouth shut and just listen for a while.’ […]

This is what dictators, tyrants and totalitarian governments do.

To maintain their propaganda, they must muzzle the institutions that reveal the facts, the objective information that informs policy decisions. Without this information, a democracy simply cannot function.

Without a vigilant press and without the free flow of government information, Trump can…

View original post 29 more words

Dictators, tyrants & the Totalitarian government of the U.S.A.


 

My girlfriend and co-worker is from Iran. Because of that resident Nazi illegally in charge of our country she will not longer be able to travel to Iran to see her siblings nor will they be able to travel here to see her and her husband. A College educated woman like myself when she was living in Iran she was a school teacher has been happily married to an American Christian for about 17 years.

My friend and I started together at the museum and we’ve always had each other’s backs. She has shown me nothing but kindness, understand and compassion. She has worked hard and was promoted to Supervisor during our nine years at the Museum. She is one of the best Security Supervisors at the Museum. She treats everyone fairly showing true leadership capabilities through service.

I’ve had the opportunity to meet her mother one of her sisters and her nephew. The most wonderful people in the world. My girlfriend’s Mom only speaks Farsi but when we first met she hugged me so tight and Loved me even though she knew of me only from her daughter’s descriptions. Now my friend’s Mom and one of her sisters live with her. The mother is nearing if not already 70.

Put yourself in their shoes and imagine how they must feel knowing they can never again travel to the land of their birth nor can her Mom see her children or my girlfriend ever see her siblings except via Skype.

All because they are Muslim.

Once the Muslim Registration begins I shall add my name and if this fascist government wishes to label me with a set of numbers like Hitler did to the Jews in Nazi Germany I shall take the mark. If my Persian girlfriend and her family must suffer I will suffer along with them. Then again as a Black Woman in America suffering and struggle is an every day affair for me anyway. I’ve been considered the “Wrong race and gender” since the day I was born.

They are coming for us. One. By. One.

 

BREAKING NEWS
Refugees have been stopped and detained at U.S. airports under President Trump’s immigration ban, prompting legal action

Saturday, January 28, 2017 8:15 AM EST

President Trump’s executive order closing the nation’s borders to refugees was put into immediate effect Friday night. Refugees who were in the air on the way to the United States when the order was signed were stopped and detained at airports.
The detentions prompted legal challenges as lawyers representing two Iraqi refugees held at Kennedy Airport filed a writ of habeas corpus early Saturday in the Eastern District of New York seeking to have their clients released. At the same time, they filed a motion for class certification, in an effort to represent all refugees and immigrants who they said were being unlawfully detained at ports of entry.

 

 

BREAKING NEWS
President Trump’s temporary ban on refugees establishes a religious test: Christians from Muslim nations will be given priority

Friday, January 27, 2017 11:03 PM EST

President Trump on Friday closed the nation’s borders to refugees from around the world, ordering that families fleeing the slaughter in Syria be indefinitely blocked from entering the United States, and temporarily suspending immigration from several predominantly Muslim countries.
Declaring the measure part of an extreme vetting plan to keep out “radical Islamic terrorists,” Mr. Trump also established a religious test for refugees from Muslim nations: He ordered that Christians and others from minority religions be granted priority over Muslims.

 

"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely" ~ Lord Acton